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20121129
20121207
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the give and take will occur. boehner and obama have met before. the summer of 2011. they put a lot of specifics on paper. when boehner coudn g backing from his conference. >> how close is this toth i didn't see this in advance. this was reallyop b. th tn goatn.3 > dl nde. s >> there has been progress. >> right now i would say we're nowhere.3 irey ssisc. paul begala, david frum, former adviser to president george w. bush. gentlemen, nice to have you both. david, let's start with you. depending on who you listen to, it's either going great or not going well at all. they're either optimistic or completely pessimistic. which is it? >> i feel about this whole process as a basketball nonfan, i feel about basketball, which is start it 100-100 and play for five minutes to get it over with. but i think we also need to take a step back and realize just how lunatic this whole process is. what the united states does not need right now is either spending cuts or tax increases. what we should be thinking about is how to get growth. instead of the mishandling of the deal in 2011, we have to pret
2008. >>> our fourth story, showdown. house speaker john boehner today gave president obama a taste of his own medicine, putting out his own proposal for avoiding the fiscal cliff. i spoke with tom coburn this hour and he said the deal boehner's put on the table is the best compromise out there. listen. >> i'm certain that if this is not good enough for the white house, we will go over the fiscal cliff. >> if you read though, the boehner proposal carefully, no tax rate increases, which we know is a nonstarter for the president. so where does that leave us? john avlon is here to help us read through the lines of the deal, also crunch some of those numbers. first, we're talking about the $800 billion figure. that's in the letter that john boehner wrote to the president. break that down for us. >> that's right. there is no numbers breaking that down. it's a where's the beef question. bumper sticker, we have the numbers but no details. boehner's aides will say that's where the negotiations come in. the devil's in the details. they'll say look, to achieve these revenue increases by closi
somewhere north of $1 trillion which is basically the difference between boehner's position and obama's position. it includes medicare cuts, entitlement cuts that are at least $400 billion. remember dick durbin on your show earlier in the week put that $400 billion marker down. democrats privately tell us they'll go higher, perhaps much higher if republicans get serious on raising taxes. they'll cut spending by about $1.2 trillion, which is the total of sequestration. and they'll probably have to throw in a debt limit increase to avoid hitting that in february. people involved in the talks feel like they can get there. there's no doubt it's going to take some time, boehner has to get republicans more comfortable with raising taxes including raising rates. i don't think there's a scenario where the rates don't go up on people making over $250,000. and democrats have to get more comfortable with entitlement changes. but at the end of the day, obama can deliver democrats. and i think boehner's stronger today than he was three months ago, and he could deliver more republicans than he coul
: they are a long way from a deal. but late today speaker boehner and president obama did speak to one another on the phone. now, this is an important development because it's the first time they've talked in a week about the fiscal cliff. i am told, though, that there was no real progress in negotiations. in this sense there was no breakthrough on that central point of tax rates. as you know, president obama insists there is no deal unless the gop agrees to raise rates on the top 2% of earners. the gop says that's a nonstarter. and the two men have not moved from that basic position. now, all of this comes at the same time treasury secretary geithner also said for the first time the administration would be willing to go over the fiscal cliff if the gop does not agree to raise those rates. this was treasury secretary geithner earlier today on cnbc. >> is the administration prepared to go over the fiscal cliff? >> oh, absolutely. there's no prospect to an agreement that doesn't involve those rates going up on the top 2% of the wealthiest. all those americans, too, get a tax cut on the first $25
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4